Dry Fire Hydrant Repair & Maintenance #04 - The Importance of Flow Testing
 
By President Mark Davis
March 8, 2018
 

Our website followers know we continually stress the importance of water supply source inspection and testing. Without flow testing, there is no definitive way to ensure the operational readiness of dry fire hydrant systems. The dry fire hydrant head shown in this news story clearly leaks. Local FD crews reported an inability to establish a prime. We connected a pumper and behold, no prime could be established. The pumper driver then back-flushed (allowed tank water to run into the DFH) and the problem was quickly found. The suction head needs to be replaced - there is no other type of repair that will remedy this problem.

Once again, the inspection and flow testing of dry fire hydrant systems in compliance with the recognized standards is very important to the success of a water supply delivery program.

 
This dry fire hydrant is located near a river and has plenty of access to good, clean water.
This dry fire hydrant is located near a river and has plenty of access to good, clean water.
Suction is taken from the middle of river and flow has never been an issue.
Suction is taken from the middle of river and flow has never been an issue.
 
When back-flushed, water freely ran out of the bottom of the suction head connection fitting. Remember, a small water leak is a huge air leak.
When back-flushed, water freely ran out of the bottom of the suction head connection fitting. Remember, a small water leak is a huge air leak.
When priming, no prime could be established.  There was an air leak somewhere (Hint: the head).
When priming, no prime could be established. There was an air leak somewhere (Hint: the head).
 

Lee Adams March 08, 2018 at 5:19 PM
DUCT TAPE!
(Not a permanent solution, but usually good for a win in a pinch)
(And only if you have it on the rig)


Randy Abbey March 08, 2018 at 10:26 PM
Plastic kitchen wrap or packaging wrap will work well for a one time fix.